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Manila Philippines Temple

Attraction type: Temples
Address: 13 Temple Drive Greenmeadows Subdivision 1110 Quezon City, National Capital Region
Phone: +63 (02) 635 0954
Fax: 63) 2-635-0958
https://www.lds.org/

“….temple serves half a million members of the LDS church in the Philippines, Singapore, Micronesia, Indonesia, Thailand, Burma and India..”

This is the 29th temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It was dedicated on September 25, 1984 by Gordon Hinckley. This temple serves half a million members of the LDS church in the Philippines, Singapore, Micronesia, Indonesia, Thailand, Burma and India. There are four ordinance rooms and three sealing rooms in the temple. It has a total area of 26, 683 square feet.

The temple stands on a hilltop overlooking the Marikina Valley. It anchors a complex of church buildings with an annex, patron housing facility, missionary training center and area offices. The ground is open to the public. It is a good place for strolling especially with palm trees and lush, colorful plants.

The Manila Philippines Temple is the first temple built in the Philippines and the second in Asia. The street where it stands is renamed to Temple Drive during the construction. Before the day of groundbreaking, a typhoon approached Manila and many were worried that the event will be postponed. Believers believe however that the prayers of the missionaries at the mission conference for the typhoon to change course helped for the typhoon to take a different direction. The groundbreaking proceeded.

Prior to its dedication, the Manila Philippines Temples saw a lot of natural disasters such as the passing of two typhoons, the eruption of Mayon Volcano and an earthquake in northern Luzon. It still remained unaffected and so in 1984 it was dedicated in nin sessions by President Gordon B. Hinckley, Second Counselor in the First Presidency.

On December 3, 1989 the grounds of the Manila Philippines Temple were taken over by rebels in an attempted military coup aiming to overthrow the government. There were damages in the temple but most of it remained unharmed.

Today, visitors can visit and check for open house schedules so they may enter the temple.